The WHO’s definition of health as a state of complete physical and social wellbeing and not just the absence of disease, goes hand in hand with what OT can offer i.e. a holistic practice from a biopsychosocial perspective where we observe and understand a person’s occupational performance across four main categories of occupation viz. Personal management, Work ability, Constructive use of free time and Social ability.

 

SA’s Older Person’s Act 13 (2006) states that rehabilitation must be provided to all older persons to enable them to reach and maintain optimal physical, sensory, intellectual, psychological and social functioning and interventions should include those that restore function or compensate for the loss of or absence of function. This speaks to quality of life and a person’s ability to carry out tasks needed to support living to the required degree of independence. Offering only weekly activities such as Chair gym, Rummikub, colouring in and watching music videos, will not achieve this.

Tom Kitwood’s Person Centred Care approach i.e knowing and understanding each person as an individual with inherent needs, likes and experiences, has shown improvement in involvement in activities because the activities selected are meaningful to each person.

The presentation will discuss the value of an OT’s input into, and the ‘how’ of developing activity programmes (structured and unstructured) that enable residents and staff to participate meaningfully and beneficially.

 

What the audience will learn

Why employ an OT in a retirement home?

OT is more than keeping residents busy.

Not everybody over 65 years likes Bingo and knitting.

Providing holistic care way beyond the medical model.

How quality of life can be enhanced for residents and staff if meaningful activities are made the core of care.

 

Recommended Articles